Capital flow

 

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Capital flow

International capital movement.



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Financial capital

Financial capital

The value of financial assets, as opposed to real assets such as buildings and capital equipment.


Capital account

Capital account

1. (Current definition) Since sometime in the 1990s, "capital account" refers to a minor component of international transactions, involving unilateral transfers of ownership of property. The common definition, below, describes what is now called the financial account. 2. (Common definition) A country's international transactions arising from changes in holdings of real and financial capital assets (but not income on them, which is in the current account). Includes FDI, plus changes in private and official holdings of stocks, bonds, loans, bank accounts, and currencies. 3. (Bretton-Woods definition) Same as common definition except excluding official reserve transactions. This definition was used under the Bretton Woods System of pegged exchange rates, but is less meaningful under floating exchange rates.


Morgan Stanley Capital International Europe Index

Morgan Stanley Capital International Europe Index

A market capitalization-weighted benchmark index made up of equities from 15 European countries. France, Germany, and the United Kingdom represent about two-thirds of the index.


Free capital markets

Free capital markets

This is not a standard term, but it seems to be used, variously, to describe the absence of government regulation of international capital flows, the absence of government or central bank intervention in exchange markets, and the absence of interference with national financial and development policies by international financial institutions.


Other capital

Other capital

In the balance of payments, other capital is a residual category that groups all the capital transactions that have not been included in direct investment, portfolio investment, and reserves categories. It is divided into long-term capital and short-term capital and, because of its residual status, can differ from country to country. Generally speaking, other long-term capital includes most nonnegotiable instruments of a year or more, like bank loans and mortgages. Other short-term capital includes financial assets that can be liquidated in less than a year such as currency, deposits, and bills.


Further Suggestions

Capital gain
capital
Cost of limited partner capital
Long term capital gain
Long Term Capital Gain
Capital control
Capital surplus
Capitalization ratios
loan capital
venture capital trust
Capital appreciation fund
Capital
Human capital
Capital market line (CML)
capital market theory
Capitalization method
Capital formation
capitalisation
Working capital ratio
Portfolio capital
capital shares
Net capital requirement
Personal tax view (of capital structure)
Capital International Indexes
Morgan Stanley Capital International Emerging Markets Global Index


 
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